In the tech world, there's often an unconscious bias in the workplace. Women are still underpaid compared to male coworkers, and worry about becoming "mommy-tracked" after pregnancy . Plus, there's still a lack of minority representation in tech that has yet to be overcome. The way past this unconscious bias in hiring and the workplace begins with individual companies becoming aware and taking action.

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Reblog Across Australia’s top 200 listed companies, only 14 women – that’s 7 per cent – have claim to the title of chief executive. So, for the ones that made it: what were the factors behind their success? What makes them tick? In the recently released major report Australian Women CEOs Speak , 21 women currently in or having occupied the position of CEO (or the equivalent) shared their experiences, career highlights, challenges, and key drivers of success that led them to the top job. 1.

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Reverse mentoring—where older executives are mentored by younger employees— is still a new concept. If done well, it can make the leader and the organisation more effective. Sreeradha D Basu speaks to experts on how to go about it. Buy-in and Acceptance It’s important for the leader to accept that a much younger person can provide valuable and often surprising feedback.

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IMF chief says increased effort is needed to meet UN’s goal of ending discrimination

Tackling gender inequality will boost economic growth in developing nations, Christine Lagarde has said, as she urged businesses worldwide to appoint more women to senior posts.

The head of the International Monetary Fund said increasing the proportion of women in prominent business and finance industry jobs could raise economic dynamism and shift firms into thinking about the long-term future of the planet.

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The philanthropist and investor is tackling sexism in Silicon Valley.

To change the world, it helps to get capital into the hands of people who have a different vision for it. A few years ago, I began quietly investing in “nontraditional” venture capital funds—”nontraditional,” of course, being industry parlance for a fund that isn’t completely overindexed on companies led by white men.

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