“Acceptance of differences was foundational for me early in my career. It’s why I could advance into roles that have historically been male-dominated. I didn’t need to fit into a mold of ‘normal.'”

We all know intuitively that differing perspectives create better solutions. So why don’t more CEOs do what it takes to install unlike-minded people in the C-suite?

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Look carefully at your leadership and confront your data honestly ... Mercer CEO Martine Ferland on what it really takes to support women in the workplace.

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Guest Column Exploring the three dimensions of gender equality Gender inequality is a reality, and there is much to be done to fight it. The beginning, however, is from the basic unit of individual and family. Comments Share Of the 21.99 lakh students that enrolled for Bachelor of Technology (B.Tech) and Bachelor of Engineering (BE) in 2014-15, around 73 percent and 71.5 percent, respectively, were men, according to the All India Survey on Higher Education.

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Over the years, the Mattel doll has been been everything from an astronaut to a firefighter to a game developer, and even the president of the United States. She’s also faced her fair share of controversy; some people have questioned whether she perpetuates stereotypical gender roles and lacks racial representation, while others believe her slim body and unrealistic proportions promote an unhealthy beauty standard. That’s not to say Barbie hasn’t evolved though.

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A job seeker holds a pen with an information booklet at a job fair. Photographer: SeongJoon Cho/Bloomberg More A job advert is the very first impression you get of a company and the position on offer – so getting the wording right is important. But it’s not as simple as just describing the job, the ideal candidate and the employer. Gender bias and the way we use words in job listings can have a serious impact on the number of women who apply.

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